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Parks

Chain Lakes Provincial Park

Bob Creek Wildland Provincial Park

Don Getty Wildland Park

Beehive Natural Area

Mount Livingstone Natural Area

Black Creek Heritage Rangeland

What is a Wildland Park?

What is a Natural Area?

 

Chain Lakes Provincial Park

Located in the Willow Creek valley between the Porcupine Hills and Rocky Mountains, this park provides year-round camping and fishing opportunities.

Beautiful campground nestled in the foothills of Canada’s prime ranching country in the Willow Creek valley between the Porcupine Hills and the Rocky Mountains.This park provides year-round camping and fishing opportunities. On site concession provides hot meals and specialty coffees. Very secluded sites surrounded by trees and willows restrict open fires to community fire-pits only.

General Information
Camping Season: January 1 – December 31
Operated By: Alberta Parks
Camping Fees: Non-powered site: $23.00 per night. Powered Sites: $30.00 per night.
Concession open May-September

Location
38 km southwest of Nanton on SH 533/40 km S of Longview on Hwy 22
Coordinates 50°12′24″N 114°11′47″W

Contact Information
Phone Number : (403) 627-1165

Recreational Activities
Beach, Camping, Canoeing/kayaking, Fishing, Group camping, Horseshoes, Ice fishing, Playground, Power boating*,Sailing, Windsurfing

*Power-driven vessels subject to a maximum speed of 12 km/hour. In posted areas, power vessels are prohibited

Alberta Parks – Chain Lakes Provincial Park

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Bob Creek Wildland Park

Bob Creek Wildland includes Whaleback Ridge, considered to be Alberta’s last remaining area of montane wilderness. It preserves extensive montane & sub-alpine landscapes and provides excellent habitat for large ungulates and carnivores such as cougars and bears. The area also contains one of Alberta’s most important elk ranges. It is estimated that over 80 bird species breed in the area, and many more use the park during the fall migration.

No facilities on site.

Contact Information
Phone Number : (403) 382-4097

Alberta Parks – Bob Creek Wildland Park

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Don Getty Wildland Provincial Park

Don Getty Wildland Provincial Park can only be accessed by hiking, horseback, or mountain bike. The park forms large sections running from the north to the south of Kananaskis Country. Each section complements its bordering protected areas. The wilderness areas represented in this park are some of the Kananaskis Country’s wildest landscapes. Don Getty Wildland Park contains several important features including Forget-Me-Not Ridge, which provides spectcular views and one of the deepest known caves in Alberta; the park also contains exceptional examples of several well-preserved periglacial features – felsenmeer, stone stripes and stone polygons. The Plateau-Cataract area of the park includes Cataract Creek, one of Alberta’s finest walk-in trout fishing streams. The park is adjacent to Livingston & Beehive natural areas.
No facilities on site.

General Information
Camping Season: May 1 – September 30
Reservation Phone: (403) 678-3136
Operated By: Parks Division
Information Phone Number: (403) 382-4097

Remember to obtain a backcountry permit for overnight stays, and please minimize your impact during your visit.

Alberta Parks – Don Getty Wildland Provincial Park

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Beehive Natural Area

Backcountry recreation activities such as hiking, fishing, and cross-country skiing can be undertaken in the Natural Area.  The site’s rugged terrain and remote location necessitate that care be exercised when visiting.  However, if you decide to venture out to Beehive, you should be prepared for changeable mountain weather conditions. Beehive Natural Area protects an important part of Alberta’s wilderness.  Please ensure that your use of the site reflects a respect for the landscape and wildlife and does not damage any of the natural features.

This site contains diverse habitats – alluvial plains of the Oldman River, alpine tundra, cliffs and extensive old-growth spruce-fir forests that are believed to be more than 1000 years old; there are also lodgepole pine forests, grasslands & moist herb meadows in the area; rare plant species have been found at a number of locations; the area provides habitat for grizzly bears, summer range for elk and lambing sites for bighorn sheep.

Beehive Natural Area is home to several rare & sensitive species including Canada lynx; peregrine falcon; golden eagle; common nighthawk; pileated woodpecker; yellow angelica; lance-leafed grape fern; Rocky Mountain willowherb; and blunt-fruited sweet cicely.

General Information
Operated By: Parks Division
Information Phone Number: (403) 382-4097

Alberta Parks – Beehive Natural Area

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Mount Livingstone Natural Area

Mt. Livingstone Natural Area is (5.35 km2) and has 1000 metres of relief, with unusual fescue grasslands well above the elevations at which they are usually found.

General Information
Type:  Backcountry/Remote
Location:  50 km southwest of Nanton
Overnight:  No
Reservations:  No
Phone:  (403) 382.4097

Alberta Parks – Mount Livingston Natural Area

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Black Creek Heritage Rangeland
This site contains the valley & ridges of the Whaleback area; relatively undisturbed montane & sub-alpine habitat; the Whaleback is considered the last remaining area of “wilderness” montane in Alberta.

Operated By: Parks Division
Information Phone Number: (403) 382-4097

Alberta Parks – Black Creek Heritage Rangeland

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Wildland Provincial Parks

  • Wildland parks are large, undeveloped natural landscapes that retain their primeval character.
  • Trails and primitive backcountry campsites are provided in some wildland parks to minimize visitor impacts on natural heritage values.
  • Some wildland parks provide significant opportunities for eco-tourism and adventure activities such as backpacking, backcountry camping, wildlife viewing, mountain climbing and trail riding.
  • Designated trails for off-highway vehicle riding and snowmobiling are provided in some wildland parks.
  • Hunting is allowed in some Wildland Parks.

Natural Areas

  • Natural areas include natural and near-natural landscapes of regional and local importance for nature-based recreation and heritage appreciation.
  • Natural areas are typically quite small, however, larger sites can be included in this class.
  • Most natural areas have no facilities and in those that do, facilities are minimal and consist mainly of parking areas and trails.
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